Tag: History

Historic District Council’s FREE Summer Mixer This Monday!

We are at a critical juncture in our borough’s history.

101 years ago, when The Bronx was born as the 62nd and last county of New York State in Melrose at The Old Bronx Borough Courthouse, there began a frenzy and expansion into our borough that forever changed our landscape.

Today we are facing a second gold rush so to speak as we are considered the last frontier in real estate development in New York City—a city that is no longer recognizable to us with the loss of many neighborhoods that have succumbed to the white washing of gentrification and “progress” littered with the same chain store after chain store.

This is a chance to mingle and meet other Bronxites concerned about the future of our borough and the issues we face. It doesn’t matter if you’re from Riverdale, The South Bronx, Morris Park, Soundview, Throggs Neck, Kingsbridge or anywhere in The Bronx—this is an event for ALL of our residents.

Volunteers Needed For No Longer Empty’s Exhibition At The Old Bronx Courthouse

No Longer Empty, the organization which transformed the Andrew Freedman Home 3 years ago into a major exhibition, is in search for volunteers for their latest project, this time at the Old Bronx Courthouse.

The exhibition, ‘When You Cut Into The Present, The Future Leaks Out’, will run from April 23rd through the end of July and feature many Bronx artists as well as artists from beyond our borders bringing what will be an amazing art-filled cultural adventure through what has been one of the most beautiful, yet enigmatic vacant structures in The Bronx.

After Over 3 Years Since Designation, Grand Concourse Historic District Signage is Finally Being Installed

In October of 2011, after almost two years from being calendared for consideration, of community meetings, historical studies, and testimonies from residents, homeowners and landlords alike, the New York City Landmarks Commission created the Grand Concourse Historic District stretching from 153rd Street and the Grand Concourse, all the way up to 167th Street.

Now, over 3 years later since that designation, the terracotta colored street signs with white lettering which mark a historic district, are finally being installed with signs at 161st Street and Grand Concourse and west on 161st and Walton.

L’Shanah Tovah From The Bronx, Once The Most Jewish of The 5 Boroughs

There was a point in time in Bronx history when there were more synagogues than you could shake a stick at in our borough when the population was majority Jewish. So Jewish that in fact that our borough once had the highest number of Jews in the five boroughs of New York City.

From Bronck to the Bronx, a Name and a Swedish Heritage to Celebrate | NYTimes

Excerpt from The New York Times:

“Nobody would mistake the municipality of Savsjo for the borough of the Bronx.

Savsjo, surrounded by dense forests in southern Sweden between Stockholm and Malmo, has about 5,000 inhabitants (about one-tenth as many as the Co-op City section of the borough alone, but about 10 times as many as the number of Bronxites who claim Swedish heritage). Its medieval churches date to the 12th century (the oldest existing house in the Bronx was built in 1748). Savsjo’s best-known sports team plays handball, not baseball.

And yet the two localities share one largely forgotten favorite son, whose Swedish heritage has only recently been confirmed: Jonas Bronck.

80 Years Later, Bronx County Courthouse & Borough Hall Still As Grand

2014 is quite the year for major Bronx anniversaries. The Bronx County Courthouse and our beloved Borough Hall celebrates the 80th anniversary of the opening of its doors for official business.

In 1934, just 20 years after Bronx County was created, the grand old building was opened up by Mayor LaGuardia in a 3 day celebration of the building’s construction. LaGuardia even moved the seat of government for New York City to the Bronx for 3 days to mark the occasion.

JFK Lived Here & More Tidbits About The Bronx

Here’s part 3 in a series of fun facts about the borough we love, The Bronx. This series is in celebration of our two major milestones: the 100th anniversary of the creation of Bronx County and the 375th anniversary of Jonas Bronck’s arrival to our borough.

The Survivors Of Orchard Beach; Sand, surf and unspeakable horrors | The Jewish Week

I grew up in the rock-and-roll ’50s in an immigrant community in the Bronx where all of our friends’ parents had blue tattoos on their arms, some large, some small, some buried under bushy arm hair and silver wristwatches, but always a row of numbers. Our parents had gold teeth, heavy accents, and names we never heard on television. The memories of my childhood summer days — the contrast between the bucolic and the indescribably horrible — served as my Holocaust 101.

10 Interesting Things & Facts About The Bronx

Many readers loved our list from last week, which highlighted 11 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About the Bronx, and we promised you we’d come back with more.

So here’s more!

11 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About The Bronx

This year the Bronx is celebrating two major anniversaries: The 375th anniversary of the first European settler — and our borough’s namesake Jonas Bronck, to call our great borough of the North home, and the 100th anniversary of the creation of Bronx County, New York State’s 62nd and last county created.

In the spirit of history, we’ve decided to compile a list of things you may not (or may) know about the Bronx.

After 36 Years, A Son of the Bronx Returns Home; Publishes Book

Bronx born and raised, storyteller, writer and author, Martin Kleinman, returned back to his birthplace after a 36 year journey living abroad — in, Queens, Manhattan, and 25 years in Park Slope, Brooklyn. (Sorry, Staten Island, as he quipped in an article in the Huffington Post back in January on a de Blasio Mayoralty).